Legal Issues Behind AI-Generated Music

Say, you make an AI that can generate music similar to what you feed in. You make a program and feed it Ed Sheeran's songs for example, is it your music, the AI's music or the musician's music? Is the training process legal? If one of these published songs was good and you monetise it, does Ed Sheeran deserve a slice, does he maybe deserve all the revenue?

These are the main questions behind AI-generated music, there are many more such as is it truly considered new content or just a remix, is the AI truly creative? The true and correct answer is, no one currently knows.

According to The Verge, copyright law across the world so far has not recognised the issue, which is fine as of current since there haven't been any AI-generated hits but the possibility certainly exists, and the chance increases overtime as AI technologies, data-mining techniques and raw hardware horsepower all increase.

If an AI is simply working from previous data that is collected and inputted by the programmer and solely moves towards replicating the artist who originally made it, is it truly creative? If we extend that logic, are we even creative by the same definition?

If an AI is simply working from previous data that is collected and inputted by the programmer and solely moves towards replicating the artist who originally made it, is it truly creative? If we extend that logic, are we even creative by the same definition?

The best guess of the law right now is that as long as any song doesn't sound too much like the original artist's music then the revenue generated on the AI-generated song will all go to the AI's creator and the song is truly the property of the AI creator.

This may seem alright, but this, like many other technologies, is a drop that causes a ripple which carries unintended consequences for other industries, what this means is that the money goes directly to the owner and many tasks become one person jobs, where one computer scientist can run an empire on his own, where the rest of the workers are AI and don't need to be paid, essentially destroying the job market.

This issue needs to be tackled and tackled before AI becomes a common thing and empires with a low amount of humans take over the corporate market because once that happens legislations become increasingly difficult to pass due to lobbyists.

One potential suggested solution to this is high-taxation with a universal basic income where not everyone needs to work, though this could lead to its own series of problems with an increasingly lazy task force. The other proposed situation is making everyone learn to program, this too is unlikely to work simply because computer science just isn't everyone's cup of tea, there will always be someone out there who's job got automated and is left out of an income because he is not needed anymore.

Parth Mahendra